How Writer’s Work Part 2

Last time when I did a post like this, I talked about how writers may add parts of themselves to characters, but how we are NOT our characters. This time I’m going to talk about how we need our space.

From what I’ve noticed, most writers are introverts or a mixture of introvert and extrovert. I have never met a extrovert writer.

From those of you who don’t know, here are the basic definitions:

Introvert- someone who gets energy from themselves, talks only when they really have something to say, thinks over things to a great extent, enjoys being alone, likes being with friends for a set amount of time

Extrovert- someone who gets energy from being with other people, talks all the time, doesn’t really have to absorb information, enjoys being around other people all the time, with no breaks

I’m a total introvert, except for the fact that I talk. A lot. If you know me, or have Skyped me before, you know that I talk none stop. For everything that you say, I’ll probably say three times as much. But I have to be alone as much as I’m with people, or I kind of, honestly, freak out. But even that is only true to some extent. I rarely tire of family (well my parents at least ;] ), and I do have a very few friends that I can easily spend a week with.

Most introverts are like that, so don’t be offended if they say no, or think of a very poor excuse, when you invite them over. Introverts will do this with anyone, even their closest friends. It doesn’t mean that we don’t like you or don’t want to be friends anymore. It means that we need some time alone.

So how does this apply to writers? I think introvertial writers can be worse in some ways, because writers value their characters equally as much as they do people. For you none-writers out there, that probably sounds insane. But think about it. We follow our characters through every single step of the story, and since we are writing it, we feel what they do. No, we do not think our characters are real [although writers will frequently joke about that], but we love our characters, which comes down to some simple things.

We need to write. We need to think. [For outliners] we need to outline. We need to edit. We need to think about what to do with our novels.

So don’t be offended if we say we need to write, so we can’t come over, go to lunch, or whatever.

We spend years on writing and perfecting our novels, so yes, we are going to want to work on that.

So before I leave, let me leave you with a list:

What to do when encountering an introvert writer:

1.) Say hi, but let them continue the conversation. If they really want to talk to you, they will keep it going.
2.) Be understanding if they say.
3.) If they say no, say, “Maybe some other time.” But don’t try to set another date. This will stress out your introvert/writer friend.
4.) Ask them how their book is going. And believe me, that’s the best way to word that question. Don’t try another way.
5.) Try something that won’t take all day. Lunch, a movie night, a ball game, walk in the park, and occasionally a sleepover.

And remember. That even though we are introverts, we love our friends!:)

Are you an introvert or an extrovert?

–NatalieNoel

NOTE FROM NATALIENOEL: *waves* hi new followers! I’m really excited because once I get 6 more followers I get to do a book giveaway! What book would you like me to give away? Any suggestions?

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